MEMPHIS (AP) — City Council members in Memphis have again postponed a vote on an expansion project at Elvis Presley’s Graceland.

Council members on Tuesday agreed for the fifth time to delay a vote related to a plan to provide tax incentives for a $100 million expansion of the Presley-themed tourist attraction.

Graceland seeks government incentives to help build retail space and a recreational vehicle park, and to expand Graceland’s hotel.

Graceland also had been seeking to add soundstages that could act as concert venues.

Council members have been concerned that the sound stages would put Graceland in competition with Memphis’ main concert venue, the FedExForum.

Graceland this week offered a new plan without the soundstages but adding a new “auxiliary building.”

Most council members wanted more time to review the new plan.

 

Police: Attorney’s wife killed him, burned his body

MANCHESTER — Police say the wife of an Atlanta attorney shot him and then burned his remains in a wooded area on their property.

News outlets report 59-year-old Melody Farris was arrested in Tennessee on Tuesday and charged with malice murder, aggravated assault and concealing a body.

Farris’ son found the remains in July 2018 in Cherokee County but the badly charred remains were difficult to identify.

The remains were later identified as that of 58-year-old Gary Farris, the founder of the Atlanta office for the regional law firm Burr & Forman. Police say the couple had marital issues.

Melody Farris is being held without bond in Manchester and is expected to be extradited to Georgia.

 

Police: Drunken driver crashed into officer’s car

KNOXVILLE — Tennessee police say a drunken driver crashed into the cruisers of two officers performing a traffic stop.

News outlets report that 44-year-old Anthony Daily struck a Knoxville police vehicle, pushing it into a second cruiser early Wednesday morning.

Knoxville police say the officers had pulled over 27-year-old Austin Reeves over driving the wrong way when Daily crashed into the cruiser, damaging both cars.

Daily suffered minor injuries and was charged with driving under the influence and driving with a suspended license. This is Daily’s fourth DUI charge.

Reeves also was charged with DUI.

 

Driver accused of killing pedestrians blames voice

JEFFERSON CITY — An arrest warrant says a driver accused of intentionally running over pedestrians in Tennessee, killing a pregnant mother and her toddler son, told police that a voice was directing his actions.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports 33-year-old William David Phillips told Jefferson City police that a voice told him that he needed to “kill meth addicts” and that the baby stroller the woman was pushing had meth in it “so he intentionally drove into (the mother and child) ... killing them both,” the warrants read.

Police say Phillips struck and killed 30-year-old Sierra Wilson Cahoon, who was pregnant, and her 2-year-old son Nolan, at random Monday afternoon. After striking mother and child, Phillips crashed into a fish hatchery.

He’s scheduled to be arraigned today.

 

Comedian, son, bring gibberish-filled chat to ad

CLARKSVILLE — The father-son duo whose video of a gibberish-filled conversation went viral is now featured in a TV commercial.

Denny’s posted the nearly two-minute ad on Twitter on Sunday for Father’s Day. Comedian DJ Pryor and his 19-month-old son Kingston are seen sitting in a booth in front of plates of breakfast food.

The two have an animated chat, with Pryor asking his son how his life is going, and the son responding in gibberish. As in the video that went viral, Pryor gives answers based on what he thinks the toddler is saying.

The pair eats a strip of bacon and shares a hug.

A video of Pryor conducting a similar conversation with Kingston went viral earlier this month.

The video surpassed a million views in two days.

  

LeMoyne-Owen College votes out president

MEMPHIS — The board of trustees of Memphis’ LeMoyne-Owen College voted out the current president following complaints about her leadership by students and faculty.

News outlets report that on Tuesday, the board announced Andrea Miller’s term would come to a close when her contract ends Sept. 1, after four years at the school.

The Commercial Appeal reports that earlier this year students penned a letter to the board, calling for Miller to resign. The letter accused Miller of having employees who were relatives, and failing to address mold and rodent problems in campus buildings.

In response to the letter, the college earlier this year released a statement saying it had addressed conditions that might hurt students’ abilities to learn.

Some faculty members submitted a vote of “no confidence” in Miller’s leadership to trustees in 2017.

 

Nashville Public Radio reporter wins national award

NASHVILLE — A Nashville Public Radio reporter has won a national Edward R. Murrow Award.

Senior health care reporter Blake Farmer of WPLN-FM won the Excellence in Writing category in the large market radio division. The Radio Television Digital News Association has administered the awards for electronic journalism since 1971.

The three stories by Farmer submitted for the contest covered trends in physician suicides, the Bonnaroo music festival embracing sober concert attendees and Alzheimer’s caretakers providing each other support.

 

Austin Peay teams with Guard on tuition deferment

CLARKSVILLE — Austin Peay State University and the Tennessee Army National Guard are offering a special tuition deferment program for Guard members.

The Leaf-Chronicle reports the program is an extension of the Tennessee STRONG Act. The act reimburses eligible Guard members for up to 120 credit hours or eight semesters toward a first-time bachelor’s degree.

An agreement announced Monday says Austin Peay will cover the up-front tuition for eligible students. The school will then be reimbursed by the National Guard through the Tennessee STRONG Act.

Speaking at a ceremony announcing the partnership, APSU President Alisa White said Guard members are lifelong learners who make the whole school better.

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